Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

Frieder Vogelmann, Reading Practices: How to read Foucault?, Krisis, Journal for Contemporary Philosophy Issue 2, 2016

Review of: Daniel Zamora and Michael Z. Behrent, Eds. (2016), Foucault and Neoliberalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 152 pages; and Mitchel Dean and Kaspar Villadsen (2016), State Phobia and Civil Society. The Political Legacy of Michel Foucault. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 196 pages.

Does Foucault have sympathies for neoliberalism? Is his analysis of it therefore rather an “apology” (Becker, Ewald and Harcourt 2012: 4) than a critique? Is his theoretical and political antistatism complicit in the neoliberal dismantling of the welfare state? Such are the questions that have sparked a lively discussion in the last year, mostly on various web blogs[1] but also in journals (Hansen 2015) – and in books, as the two under review here.

Set off by Daniel Zamora’s interview with the strange title “Can We Criticize Foucault?” in the journal Ballast (an English translation appeared in Jacobin),[2] the bold and sweeping accusations that not only had Foucault himself been at least uncritical, if not supportive of neoliberalism, but also that “Foucault scholasticism” (Behrent 2016 [2014]: 54) is therefore implicated in the neoliberal strategy and that this constitutes Foucault’s “political legacy”, (Dean and Villadsen 2016) seem to have touched a sensitive spot within current Foucaultian scholarship. Although Johanna Oksala (2015) is fundamentally right in her assessment that “this debate itself seems misguided,”[3] there is something to learn from this misguided debate because it brings out two questions mostly left unattended by all its participants (but see Erlenbusch 2015): How do weread Foucault? And how does Foucault read (neoliberals like Gary Becker, for example)? By way of reviewing first the English edition of Daniel Zamora’s Critiquer Foucault (2014), and second Mitchell Dean’s and Kaspar Villadsen’s monograph State Phobia and Civil Society (2016), I will argue that the questions of how we read Foucault and how Foucault reads are not sufficiently addressed.

read more

Read Full Post »

Ott, J.C.
Perceptions of the Nature of Happiness: Cultural, but Related to the Dynamics of the Human Mind and the Gratification of General Needs: Review of Laura Hyman: Happiness; Understanding Narratives and Discourses, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, ISBN: 978-1-137-32152-7
(2016) Journal of Happiness Studies, pp. 1-7. Article in Press.

DOI: 10.1007/s10902-016-9720-6

Abstract
In her book ‘Happiness’ Laura Hyman identifies some discourses, as defined by Foucault, about happiness among 19 middle-class respondents in the UK. A discourse is a way of thinking and communicating about some issue, and comparable to a ‘perception’ or a’ view’. The dominant ‘Therapeutic Discourse’, is based on the view that happiness is an individual and normative challenge; it is to be worked on by selfcare and self-knowledge. A somewhat contradictory discourse puts more priority on social relations, as a condition for happiness. Hyman explains the co-existence of these discourses as a consequence of individualization. Individualization puts more priority on individual responsibility, but can easily lead to a neglect of social relations. It is difficult to assess the universality of these discourses, because the sample of respondents is very homogeneous. If individualization is an important factor we might expect different discourses in more collectivistic cultures. There are, however, theoretical reasons to believe that these discourses are rather universal. We may expect that the gratification of general needs is important. If certain needs are not gratified they will get more attention, and more priority, in a discourse about happiness. The ‘Therapeutic Discourse’, more in particular, is apparently a logical consequence of the dynamics of the human mind. The characteristics of the human consciousness clearly support this discourse. We need more empirical research, about discourses in different cultures, to find out for sure! © 2016 The Author(s)

Author Keywords
Capitalism; Discourse; Enlightenment; Gratification of needs; Happiness; Hedonic level of affect; Human needs; Individualization; Life-satisfaction

Index Keywords
clinical article, consciousness, empirical research, happiness, human, human tissue, individualization, narrative, neglect, perception, responsibility, social interaction, theoretical model

Read Full Post »

Progressive Geographies

FBP cover.jpgHere is the cover for Foucault: The Birth of Power. The book is forthcoming in early 2017 with Polity, and the design fits with Foucault’s Last Decade which came out earlier this year. There is a lot about Foucault’s political activism in this second book, so the covers make a nice contrasting pair. More information on the two books here.

Michel Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge was published in March 1969; Discipline and Punish in February 1975. Although only separated in time by six years, the difference in tone is stark: the former is a methodological treatise, the latter a call to arms. What accounts for the radical shift in Foucault s approach?

Several transitions took place during this period. Foucault returned to France from Tunisia, first to the experimental University of Vincennes and then to a prestigious chair at the Collège de France. Tunisia was a political awakening for…

View original post 150 more words

Read Full Post »

gautamSanjay k. Gautam, Foucault and the Kamasutra. The Courtesan, The Dandy, And The Birth Of Ars Erotica As Theater In India, University of Chicago Press, 2016

The Kamasutra is best known in the West for its scandalous celebration of unbridled sensuality. Yet, there is much, much more to it; embedded in the text is a vision of the city founded on art and aesthetic pleasure. In Foucault and the “Kamasutra”, Sanjay K. Gautam lays out the nature and origin of this iconic Indian text and engages in the first serious reading of its relationship with Foucault.

Gautam shows how closely intertwined the history of erotics in Indian culture is with the history of theater-aesthetics grounded in the discourse of love, and Foucault provides the framework for opening up an intellectual horizon of Indian thought. To do this, Gautam looks to the history of three inglorious characters in classical India: the courtesan and her two closest male companions—her patron, the dandy consort; and her teacher and advisor, the dandy guru. Foucault’s distinction between erotic arts and the science of sexuality drives Gautam’s exploration of the courtesan as a symbol of both sexual-erotic and aesthetic pleasure. In the end, by entwining together Foucault’s works on the history of sexuality in the West and the classical Indian texts on eros, Gautam transforms our understanding of both, even as he opens up new ways of investigating erotics, aesthetics, gender relations, and subjectivity.

Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1 Foucault and the Notion of Ars Erotica: Pleasure as Desubjectivation
2 Pleasure and Patriarchy: The Discourse of Dharma and the Figure of the Wife
3 The Courtesan and the Birth of Ars Erotica asTheater
4 The Courtesan and the Origins of the Na?yasastra: From Ars Erotica to Ars Theatrica
5 The Dandy-Guru and the Birth of the Discourses of Erotics and Theater
6 The City Dandy and the Vision of the City Based on Art
7 Foucault and the Kamasutra: Parting Ways

Read Full Post »

bouveresse Editor: I posted up a review of this book earlier. It is attracting quite a bit of attention in France hence the repost. See the links at the end of this post

Jacques Bouveresse, Nietzsche contre Foucault Sur la vérité, la connaissance et le pouvoir. Agone, 25/01/2016

Avant-propos de Benoit Gaultier et Jean-Jacques Rosat.

Et si Nietzsche, dont Foucault s’est tant réclamé, parlait souvent contre lui ?

La plupart des expressions typiques de Foucault dans lesquelles le mot « vérité » intervient comme complément – « production de la vérité », « histoire de la vérité », « politique de la vérité », « jeux de vérité », etc. – reposent sur une confusion peut-être délibérée entre deux choses que Frege considérait comme essentiel de distinguer : l’être-vrai et le tenir-pour-vrai. Or peu de philosophes ont insisté avec autant de fermeté que Nietzsche sur cette différence radicale qui existe entre ce qui est vrai et ce qui est cru vrai : « La vérité et la croyance que quelque chose est vrai : deux univers d’intérêts tout à fait séparés l’un de l’autre, presque des univers opposés ; on arrive à l’un et à l’autre par des chemins fondamentalement différents », écrit-il dans L’Antéchrist. Foucault, alors qu’il n’a jamais traité que des mécanismes, des lois et des conditions historiques et sociales de production de l’assentiment et de la croyance, en a tiré abusivement des conclusions concernant la vérité elle-même.

Sur la vérité, l’objectivité, la connaissance et la science, il est trop facilement admis aujourd’hui – le plus souvent sans discussion – que Foucault aurait changé la pensée et nos catégories. Mais il y a dans ses cours trop de confusions conceptuelles entre vérité, connaissance et pouvoir, trop de questions élémentaires laissées en blanc – et, tout simplement, trop de non-sens pour qu’on doive se rallier à pareille opinion. Quant au nietzschéisme professé par Foucault, il repose sur une lecture trop étroite, qui ne résiste pas à une confrontation attentive avec les textes, notamment ceux du Nietzsche de la maturité.

À l’écart aussi bien des panégyriques que des verdicts idéologiques, le philosophe Jacques Bouveresse, professeur au Collège de France, lit Nietzsche et Foucault à la hauteur où ils doivent être lus : avec les mêmes exigences intellectuelles qu’il applique à Wittgenstein et à Musil, et une libre ironie qu’il fait sienne plus que jamais.

Sommaire : I. L’objectivité, la connaissance et le pouvoir (conférence, 2000) ; II. Remarques sur le problème de la vérité chez Nietzsche et sur Foucault lecteur de Nietzsche (essai inédit, 2013-2015) : 1. Ce qui est connu doit-il être vrai ? ; 2. La connaissance sans vérité et la vérité sans vérité ; 3. La vérité pourrait-elle n’être pas la cause de la connaissance, mais son effet ?; 4. La volonté du vrai et la volonté de la distinction du vrai et du faux ; 5. Nietzsche, la « preuve de force » et la « preuve de vérité » de la foi ; 6. La volonté de savoir et la volonté de croire ; 7. La recherche de la connaissance véritable et de la vérité vraie ; 8. Peut-il y avoir une histoire de la vérité ? ; 9. Le concept d’« alèthurgie » : la vérité et ses manifestations.

Professeur au Collège de France, Jacques Bouveresse a publié de nombreux ouvrages de philosophie du langage et de la connaissance mais aussi sur des écrivains comme Robert Musil et Karl Kraus. Il est aussi l’un des principaux commentateurs français de Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Pour visiter la page consacrée à Jacques Bouveresse sur le site du Collège de France

Critiques, comptes rendus et essais

Autour de Jacques Bouveresse blog. Ce blog est là pour diffuser les informations (audio/video/livres/articles) autour des travaux du philosophe Jacques Bouveresse

La vérité en question, Le Monde diplomatique

Actu philosophia

Bouveresse, Opération vérité, Libération

Philosophie-magazine

Ouvertures, le temps du citoyen magazine

Strass de la philosophie blog

Émissions • Les Nouveaux chemins de la connaissance • Nietzsche contre Foucault par Jacques Bouveresse, France Culture, audio podcast

Librairie Tropiques. Includes two videos of debates

Read Full Post »

vincencioEduardo Rivera Vicencio, Teoría de la Gubernamentalidad CorporativaAspectos Generales y Conformación Monetaria, Megustaescribir, 2016

“Teoría de la gubernamentalidad corporativa” es recomendable para todo tipo de público interesado en conocer la realidad de la economía y sus crisis, es imprescindible para todas las personas que trabajan en el sector público y en la política, y es fundamental para los empresarios de la economía real, directivos y los profesionales del área económica. La primera parte corresponde al respaldo teórico para aquellos que quieran profundizar en el tema, la segunda parte describe los aspectos generales de esta teoría y en la tercera parte se hace una descripción histórica y económica de la conformación monetaria, que ha permitido la concentración de la riqueza, la apropiación de las rentas y de sus rendimientos. Esta teoría tiene como hilo conductor la metodología de Michel Foucault histórica y filosófica (arqueológica y genealógica), con la argumentación y respaldo teórico económico, junto a las manifestaciones de las relaciones de poder, como el discurso, la disciplina, la ética y la gubernamentalidad. Este libro describe la conformación del “homo economicus”, de la empresa y de los primeros bancos centrales, hasta el sistema de dinero-deuda actual, como herramientas de dominación.

Eduardo Rivera Vicencio nació en Santiago de Chile en 1959, es profesor de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, miembro del Consejo Editorial de International Journal of Critical Accounting, miembro del Consejo Editorial de African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, miembro de Global Center for Corporate Governance y presidente para Sudamérica de la Research Section of the Critical Accounting Society.

Read Full Post »

Pierre Macherey, 10 – Foucault lecteur de Roussel : la littérature comme philosophie, Pierre Macherey À quoi pense la littérature ?, Presses Universitaires de France, 1990, édition numérique (2016)

Premières lignes
Dans son travail, Foucault a réservé une place exceptionnelle à la littérature, à laquelle il a reconnu le statut d’un révélateur théorique : Les mots et les choses, dont le titre évoque directement les problèmes de la littérature, en témoignent particulièrement. Foucault a fait plus que réfléchir sur la littérature, il a travaillé avec la littérature : ce qui le préoccupait, c’était d’en faire un…

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: