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Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

seymourChildren’s Spatialities: Embodiment, Emotion and Agency
Editors: Seymour, Julie, Hackett, Abigail, Procter, Lisa (Eds.)
Palgrave Macmillan, 2015

This book as the foreword states ‘takes up Foucault’s challenge to “examine the critical power of space and place in being and becoming of children’s lives’.

Drawing from a wide range of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, architecture and geography, and international contributors, this volume offers both students and scholars with an interest in the interdisciplinary study of childhood a range of ways of thinking spatially about children’s lives.

Table of contents (11 chapters)
Introduction: Spatial Perspectives and Childhood Studies
Hackett, Abigail (et al.)
Pages 1-17

Knowing the World Through Your Body: Children’s Sensory Experiences and Making of Place
Mackley, Kerstin Leder (et al.)
Pages 21-38

The Place of Time in Children’s Being
Curtis, Elizabeth
Pages 39-53

Making the ‘Here’ and ‘Now’: Rethinking Children’s Digital Photography with Deleuzian Concepts
Sakr, Mona (et al.)
Pages 54-74

Children’s Embodied Entanglement and Production of Space in a Museum
Hackett, Abigail
Pages 75-92

Children’s Emotional Geographies: Politics of Difference and Practices of Engagement
Blazek, Matej
Pages 95-111

Reconceptualising Children’s Play: Exploring the Connections Between Spaces, Practices and Emotional Moods
Karoff, Helle Skovbjerg
Pages 112-127

‘No, You’ve Done It Once!’: Children’s Expression of Emotion and Their School-Based Place-Making Practices
Procter, Lisa
Pages 128-143

Approaches to Children’s Spatial Agency: Reviewing Actors, Agents and Families
Seymour, Julie
Pages 147-162

Children and Young People’s Spatial Agency
Woolley, Helen
Pages 163-177

A Proper Place for a Proper Childhood? Children’s Spatiality in a Play Centre
Satta, Caterina
Pages 178-197

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History and Obstinacy (2016)

obstinacy History and Obstinacy
By Alexander Kluge and Oskar Negt
Edited by Devin Fore

With Cyrus Shahan, Martin Brady, Helen Hughes and Joel Golb
Translated by Richard Langston
The MIT Press, 2016

Devin Fore’s introduction which refers to Foucault can be found on his university website

Overview
If Marx’s opus Capital provided the foundational account of the forces of production in all of their objective, machine formats, what happens when the concepts of political economy are applied not to dead labor, but to its living counterpart, the human subject? The result is Alexander Kluge and Oskar Negt’s History and Obstinacy, a groundbreaking archaeology of the labor power that has been cultivated in the human body over the last two thousand years.

Supplementing classical political economy with the insights of fields ranging from psychoanalysis and phenomenology to evolutionary anthropology and systems theory, History and Obstinacy reaches down into the deepest strata of unconscious thought, genetic memory, and cellular life to examine the complex ecology of expropriation and resistance.

First published in German 1981, and never before translated into English, this epochal collaboration between Kluge and Negt has now been edited, expanded, and updated by the authors in response to global developments of the last decade to create an entirely new analysis of “the capitalism within us.”

About the Authors

Alexander Kluge is an author and filmmaker, known for launching the New German Cinema in the early 1960s.

Oskar Negt is Professor of Sociology at the Universität Hannover. Early in his career, he was a student of Theodor Adorno and assistant to Jürgen Habermas.

About the Editor

Devin Fore is Associate Professor in the Department of German at Princeton University.

Endorsements
“This book is an astounding manifestation of an improbable constellation of a great writer and filmmaker and an important social philosopher. They combine the production forces of two rare minds who mutually complement each another. Readers will enjoy the illuminating insights and surprising discoveries from the revealing assemblages of ideas, arguments, and imaginations.”
Jürgen Habermas

“By presenting theory as montage with photos, highlighted text, excursuses, diagrams, and box quotes, History and Obstinacy takes up the legacies of the historical avant-garde, but it does so in an anti-vanguardist mode. As it explores materialist anthropology, the archeology of labor power, histories and stories of defiance and tenacious resistance, it turns its political attention toward the extended past that grounds our evolving present. In its search for answers about the neglected organic and subjective dimension of capital’s logic, this book speaks more directly to our current condition than its historical origin in a period of post-1960s disorientation might suggest. An indispensable message in a bottle from another time and a pleasure to read.”
Andreas, Huyssen

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de-valkde Valk, Mark (Ed.) Screening the Tortured Body. The Cinema as Scaffold, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016

Inspired by Michel Foucault’s examination of state subjugation and control, this book considers post-structuralist notions of the ‘political technology of the body’ and ‘the spectacle of the scaffold’ as a means to analyse cinematic representations of politically-motivated persecution and bodily repression. Through a critique of sovereign power and its application of punishment ‘for transgressions against the state’, the collected works, herein, assess the polticised-body via a range of cinematic perspectives. Imagery, character construction and narrative devices are examined in their account of hegemonic-sanctioned torture and suppression as a means to a political outcome. Screening The Tortured Body: The Cinema as Scaffold elicits philosophical and cultural accounts of the ‘retrained’ body to deliberate on a range of politicised films and filmmakers whose narratives and mise-en-scène techniques critique corporeal subjugation by authoritarian factions.

Table of contents – ebook links

Tortured Spectators: Massacred and Mucosal
MacCormack, Patricia
Pages 9-24

Torture Porn: The American Sadistic Disposition in the Post-9/11 Horror Genre
Kerner, Aaron
Pages 25-49

Discipline… But Punish!: Foucault, Agamben and Torture Porn’s Thanotopolitical Scaffold
Aldana-Reyes, Xavier
Pages 51-69

The Expectational Body: The Becoming of the Tortured Vampire Horde in Daybreakers
Bacon, Simon
Pages 71-88

An Apology for French Torturers: L’Ennemi intime (2007)
Wallenbrock, Nicole Beth
Pages 89-108

The Ideological Purpose of Torture: Artur London’s Nightmare of Reality in L’Aveu/The Confession (Costa-Gavras, 1970)
Hayward, Susan
Pages 111-132

Mr. Stone Goes to Washington: JFK 2.4
Valk, Mark
Pages 133-157

There’s No Geneva Convention Here: Torture in Three Films Set in World War II
Turim, Maureen
Pages 159-174

Modes of Silence and Resistance: Chilean Documentary and Gendered Torture
DiGiovanni, Lisa
Pages 177-206

Torture Documentaries and Taxi to the Dark Side (Alex Gibney, 2007)
Lesage, Julia
Pages 207-237

Zero Dark Thirty: A Filmmaker’s Notion
Anderson, Larra
Pages 239-263

Hypermediacy, Embodiment and Spectatorship in Brian de Palma’s
Fagan, Calvin
Pages 265-279

Enemy of the State: Framing the Political Assassin
O’Sullivan, Shane
Pages 281-317

‘She’s a Killer,’ ‘The Image of the Women of Zero Dark Thirty’
Olkowski, Dorothea
Pages 319-336

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petersenBendix Petersen, Eva, Millei, Zsuzsa (Eds.), Interrupting the Psy-Disciplines in Education, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016

This book offers critical explorations of how the psy-disciplines, Michel Foucault’s collective term for psychiatry, psychology and psycho-analysis, play out in contemporary educational spaces. With a strong focus on Foucault’s theories, it critically investigates how the psy-disciplines continue to influence education, both regulating and shaping behaviour and morality. The book provides insight into different educational contexts and concerns across a child’s educational lifespan; early childhood education, inclusive education, special education, educational leadership, social media, university, and beyond to enable reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based knowledge and practice.

With chapters by a mixture of established and emerging international scholars in the field this is an interdisciplinary and authoritative study into the role of the psy-disciplines in the education system. Providing vivid illustrations from throughout the educational lifespan the book serves as an invaluable tool for reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based practice, and will be of particular interest to academics and scholars in the field of education policy and psychology.

Contents

‘Silences’ in the ‘Inclusive’ Early Childhood Classroom: Sustaining a ‘Taboo’
Watson, Karen
Pages 13-31

Binds of Professionalism: Attachment in Australian and Finnish Early Years Policy
Millei, Zsuzsa (et al.)
Pages 33-57

Becoming a ‘Learner’ in the Australian Primary School: An (Auto)ethnographic Exploration
Petersen, Eva Bendix
Pages 59-74

The Principal Is Present: Producing Psy-ontologies Through Post/Psychology-Informed Leadership Practices II
Staunæs, Dorthe (et al.)
Pages 75-92

Positive Education as Translation and Conquest of Schooling
Saari, Antti (et al.)
Pages 93-110

Labouring Over the Truth: Learning to Be/Come Queer
Bansel, Peter (et al.)
Pages 111-127

Re-thinking ‘Pointiness’: Special Education Interrupted
Laws, Cath
Pages 129-144

Confusions and Conundrums During Final Practicum: A Study of Preservice Teachers’ Knowledge of Challenging Behaviour
McMahon, Samantha (et al.)
Pages 145-166

‘No, I’m Not OK’: Disrupting ‘Psy’ Discourses of University Mental Health Awareness Campaigns
Saltmarsh, Sue
Pages 167-183

The Risk Factors For Psy-Diagnosis? Gender, Racialization and Social Class
Allan, Julie (et al.)
Pages 185-202

‘How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?’ Troubling the Psy-gaze in the Qualitative Analysis and Representation of Educational Subjects’
Wilson-Wheeler, Matthew
pages 203-220

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sokhi-bulleyBal Sokhi-Bulley, Governing (Through) Rights, Hart Publishing, 2016

About Governing (Through) Rights
Taking a critical attitude of dissatisfaction towards rights, the central premise of this book is that rights are technologies of governmentality. They are a regulating discourse that is itself managed through governing tactics and techniques – hence governing (through) rights. Part I examines the ‘problem of government’ (through) rights. The opening chapter describes governmentality as a methodology that is then used to interrogate the relationship between rights and governance in three contexts: the international, regional and local. How rights regulate certain identities and conceptions of what is good governance is examined through the case study of non-state actors, specifically the NGO, in the international setting; through a case study of rights agencies, and the role of experts, indicators and the rights-based approach in the European Union or regional setting; and, in terms of the local, the challenge that the blossoming language of responsibility and community poses to rights in the name of less government (Big Society) is problematised. In Part II, on resisting government (through) rights, the book also asks what counter-conducts are possible using rights language (questioning rioting as resistance), and whether counter-conduct can be read as an ethos of the political, rights-bearing subject and as a new ethical right. Thus, the book bridges a divide between critical theory (ie Foucauldian understandings of power as governmentality) and human rights law.

Table of contents
Part I: Government (Through) Rights
1. Introduction
2. Governing (Through) Agencies: The EU and Rights in EUrope
3. Governing (Through) Non-Governmental Actors: The Global Human Rights Architecture and the International NGO
Part II: Resisting Government (Through) Rights
4. Resisting Rights with Responsibility
5. Counter-Conduct as Right and as Ethics
6. Conclusion: A Permanent State of Dissatisfaction

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Interview with Stuart Elden by Dave O’Brien (podcast) on the New Books Network

In relation to Foucault’s Last Decade Polity Press 2016

Why did Michel Foucault radically recast the project of The History of Sexuality? How did he work collaboratively? What was the influence of Antiquity on his thought? In Foucault’s Last Decade (Polity Press, 2016) Stuart Elden, Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick explores these, and many more, questions about the final years in a rich intellectual life. The book combines detailed studies of Foucault’s recently collected lecture series with archival material and his publications, to give an in depth engagement with the changes and continuities in his thought during the last decade. Addressing questions associated with key terms, such as governmentality, as well as confession, the self, power, truth telling, and many other core ideas and themes, the book will be essential reading for anyone interested in this most important of Western thinkers.

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Jason Read, Cutting Off Heads. A review of Foucault with Marx by Jacques Bidet (Zed Books: London, 2016)

Jacques Bidet’s Foucault with Marx represents yet another contribution to the eventual overcoming of an academic skirmish between advocates of Foucault and Marx, itself a smaller conflict in the larger battle of postmodernism versus Marxism. The perspective which saw Marx and Foucault as mutually opposed theoretical camps has begun to fade thanks to both the publication of Foucault’s courses and lectures, most importantly the short essay on “The Mesh of Power,” and the publication of several texts, such as the monumental collection Marx & Foucault: Lectures, usages, confrontations in France. However, the dissipation of Team Foucault and Team Marx is only a first step; it remains to be seen how Foucault and Marx are related and how their different examinations into history, modernity, and society can be brought together through their points of connection and differences.

read more

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