Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Special Issues’ Category

Call for Papers: DISCOURSES OF MADNESS/ DISCOURS DE LA FOLIE (Special volume of Neohelicon [43, 2016]. Guest-Editor: R.-L. Etienne Barnett)

PROSPECTUS

Contributions on any aspect of madness in (of, and) textuality are welcome for consideration. Possible areas of focus, among a plethora of other options: literary representations of the alienated mind; mad protagonists or mad writers; madness as a vehicle of exile, as a form of marginalization, of dissipation, of disintegration, of revelation or self-revelation; interpretations of madness as a manifestation of structure, style, rhetoric, narrative; madness as a reflection of cultural assumptions, values, prohibitions; madness, as prophetic or dionysiac, poetic, or other; the esthetics of madness; philosophical, ethical, ontological, epistemological, hermeneutic and esthetic implications of the discourse/narrative of madness..

From an alternative vantage point, one might question: how does the deviant mind-set of authorial figures and/or fictional characters determine the organization of time, space and plot in the narrative? How does the representation of delusional worlds differ from the representation of other “non-mad” mental acts (dreams, fantasies, aspirations) and from other fictional worlds (magic, imaginings, phantoms) — if it does? Contributors are welcome to address these and other questions in a specific work, in a group of works, or in a more general/theoretical reflection, in and across any national tradition(s), literary movement(s) or œuvre(s).

ILLUMINATIONS

  • Do not mistake for wisdom these fantasies /Of your sick mind. (W. Soyinka)
  • I could spend my whole life prying loose the secrets of the insane. (A. Breton)
  • When we remember that we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained. (M. Twain)
  • If we lose our sanity/We can but howl the lugubrious howl of idiots/The howl of the utterly lost/Howling their nowhere-ness. (D. H. Lawrence)
  • When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? (Cervantes)
  • There is always some reason in madness. (Nietzsche)
  • No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness. (Aristotle)
  • Behind their dark glass, the mad own nothing. (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
  • The madman will no longer be the exiled one, the one relegated to the margins of our cities, but rather he who becomes a stranger to the self, impugned for being who he is. (M. Foucault)
  • So long as man is protected by madness, he functions and flourishes. (E. Cioran)
  • Culture is perishing, as are we … in an avalanche of words, in sheer madness. (M. Kundera)
  • The most beautiful things are those that madness prompts and reason writes. (A. Gide)
  • Books have led some to learning and others to madness. (Petrarch)
  • What is life? A madness. What is life? An illusion, a shadow, a story. And the greatest good is yet minimal; for all life is a dream, and dreams themselves are only dreams. (Calderón de la Barca)
  • Where am I, I don’t know, I’ll never know, in the silence you don’t know, you’ll never know, you must go on, I can’t go on, I’ll go on. (S. Beckett)
  • Demoniac frenzy, moping melancholy, and moon-struck madness. (J. Milton)

 

SUBMISSIONS

Theoretical or applied contributions focused upon “discourses of madness” in the literary “arena” are invited and will be accorded full and serious consideration.

Manuscripts in English, French German or Italian — not to exceed twenty (25) double-spaced pages, including notes, bibliography and appendices, where applicable — are welcome. Contributions written in any but one’s first (or native) language must be scrupulously reviewed, edited and proofed by a “native” specialist prior to submission.

Format and submission requirements: Papers must prepared in strict accordance with APA (not MLA) guidelines and are to be accompanied by an abstract and 6-8 key words or expressions in English. (A second abstract and set of key words in the language of the article, if not in English, is strongly recommended.)

Submit via email in the form of a WORD document (attachment) to: R.-L. Etienne Barnett (Guest-Editor) at: RL_Barnett@msn.com (primary submission address) with a second copy to RLEBarnett@editionsdegresecond.be (secondary submission address).

SUBMISSION DEADLINE
OCTOBER 1, 2015

Prof. R.-L. Etienne Barnett
RL_Barnett@msn.com (Primary Email)
RLEBarnett@editionsdegresecond.be (Secondary Email)
Email: rl_barnett@msn.com (primary email)
Visit the website at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/11059

Read Full Post »

Call For Papers:

Conduct and Counter-Conduct:
Critical Concepts for Old and New Times?

A special issue of Foucault Studies,

edited Barbara Cruikshank (University of Massachusetts at Amherst)
and Sam Binkley (Emerson College)

PDF of Call for papers

Recently, Arnold Davidson* distinguished Michel Foucault’s conceptions of conduct and counter-conduct as the most notable contribution of Foucault’s 1978 lectures. “It is astonishing,” he wrote, “and of profound significance, that the autonomous sphere of conduct has been more or less invisible in the history of modern (as opposed to ancient) moral and political philosophy.” Following Davidson’s lead, we invite contributions for a special issue of Foucault Studies on the theme of counter-conduct. We invite submissions, in particular, to take up the historical, conceptual, and political significance of conduct and counter-conduct either separately or in combination. These might include theoretical inquiries, empirical studies, comparative historical works, interpretive cultural studies or any other mode of intellectual engagement that addresses the theme of counter-conduct.

Questions and topics we aim to address in this volume include:

  • Given the immanent relation between conduct and counter-conduct, what is the critical difference between them? How can we distinguish between an instance of conduct and one of counter-conduct?
  • How should we understand the concepts of conduct and counter-conduct, articulated by Foucault in 1978, in relation to his previous and subsequent published works? Or, do these concepts stand apart in relation to a particular problematization?
  • Are these categories we can use across time, place, religions, institutions? If so, what forms do conduct and counter-conduct take today? If not, what demarcates their usage?
  • How can contemporary political movements, governmentalities, or moral and political philosophies be engaged through the concepts of conduct and counter-conduct?
  • Does counter-conduct help us understand new subjectivities and identities shaped by race, class, gender, sexuality, ability or other categories at the margins?
  • What value does the concept of counter-conduct hold for historical studies?
  • How is counter-conduct distinguishable from reform and reformation of the self, institutions, or of society? Foucault struggled in his lecture to distinguish counter-conduct as a category from resistance, revolt, and dissent, among other categories. Why does Foucault need to invent a new concept rather than use the vocabularies of pastoral struggles themselves?
  • What contribution can the concept of counter-conduct make to contemporary scholarship on governmentality?
  • What is the significance of counter-conduct in the context of contemporary neoliberalism or other formations of global capital, and to the many oppositional social movements that have emerged in their wake?
  • How can counter-conduct be understood alongside other theorizations of resistance, revolt, and transgression derived from Marxism, post-colonial theory, feminism, cultural studies or queer theory?
  • What is the relationship of counter-conduct to religion, spirituality and mysticism, either historically or in contemporary manifestations?
  • How does counter-conduct enable a bridge between the politics and ethics, either in Foucault’s researches or in other contexts?

This special issue of Foucault Studies will appear in Spring 2016. At this time the editors welcome abstracts for submission by October 1, 2014. Final essays will be due April 1, 2015. Please direct all questions and correspondence to both editors: Samuel_binkley@emerson.edu, and cruiksha@polsci.umass.edu.

Foucault Studies is an open-access, peer reviewed interdisciplinary online journal. Since 2004, Foucault Studies has covered the full influence of Foucauldian thought on such problematics and fields of study as power, politics, law, history, social and cultural theory, sexuality, race, religion, gender studies, psychoanalysis, philosophy, geography, architecture, education, health studies, management studies and media studies, as well as others. The Journal also publishes translations of shorter pieces from Foucault’s oeuvre, and carries book reviews, conference and seminar reports. Visit Foucault Studies at www.foucault-studies.com.

_________________________________

* Arnold I. Davidson, “In Praise of Counter-Conduct”, History of the Human Sciences October 2011 vol. 24 no. 4 25-41

Read Full Post »

fs-17

Foucault Studies is pleased to announce the publication of issue 17

A Special Issue on Foucault and Deleuze
guest edited by Nicolae Morar, Thomas Nail, Daniel W. Smith

Issue 17 also includes:

3 original articles on the topics of:
Foucault’s discursive practices
Orientalist discourses in Foucault’s work
Foucault’s late studies of and with classical Greek and Roman texts

9 book reviews

Foucault Studies is an electronic, open access, peer reviewed, international journal that provides a forum for scholarship engaging the intellectual legacy of Michel Foucault, interpreted in the broadest possible terms. We welcome submissions ranging from theoretical explications of Foucault’s work and texts to interdisciplinary engagements across various fields, to empirical studies of contemporary phenomena using Foucaultian.

All articles are freely available as open access on our website:

www.foucault-studies.com

 

Number 17:

April 2014: Foucault and Deleuze

Table of Contents
Editorial
Sverre Raffnsøe, Alain Beaulieu, Sam Binkley, Patricia Clough, Sven Opitz, Jyoti Puri, Jens Erik Kristensen, Alan Rosenberg, Marius Gudmand-Høyer, Johanna Oksala, Knut Ove Eliassen, Mathias Adam Munch
____________________________________________


Special Issue on Foucault and Deleuze

Foucault and Deleuze – Guest Editors’ Introduction
       Nicolae Morar, Thomas Nail, Daniel W. Smith

Three Concepts for Crossing the Nature-Artifice Divide: Technology, Milieu, and Machine
       Marco Altamirano

Becoming-Other: Foucault, Deleuze, and the Political Nature of Thought
       Vernon W. Cisney

Freedom, Teleodynamism, Creativity
       William E. Connolly

Ethics and the ontology of freedom: problematization and responsiveness in Foucault and Deleuze
       Erinn Cunniff Gilson

Foucault and Deleuze: Making a Difference with Nietzsche
       Wendy Grace

Uncertain Ontologies
Dianna Taylor

Toward a Theory of Transversal Politics: Deleuze and Foucault’s Block of Becoming
Christopher Penfield
____________________________________________

Articles

Reclaiming discursive practices as an analytic focus: Political implications
       Carol Bacchi, Jennifer Bonham

Orientalism as a form of Confession
       Andrea Teti

For The Love Of Boys
       John M. Carvalho

___________________________________________


Reviews

Johanna Oksala, Foucault, Politics, and Violence (Evanston, Il: Northwestern University Press, 2012)
       Christopher Mayes

Luca Paltrinieri, L’expérience du concept (Paris: Publications de la Sorbonne, 2012)
       Matteo Vagelli

Simon O’Sullivan, On the Production of Subjectivity: Five Diagrams of the Finite-Infinite Relation (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
       Tara Marie Dankel

Rosi Braidotti, Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory (New York: Colombia University Press, 2011)
       Mujde Kliem

Daniel W. Smith and Henry Somers-Hall (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Deleuze (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012)
       Kenneth Noe

Paul Elliot, Guattari Reframed (London; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2012)
       Jonathan Fardy

Mark Bonta and John Protevi, Deleuze and Geophilosophy: A Guide and Glossary (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004)
       Cheryl Gilge, Keith Harris

Colin Koopman, Genealogy as Critique: Foucault and the Problems of Modernity (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013)
       George W. Shea, IV

Michel Foucault, Le beau danger: Entretien avec Claude Bonnefoy, édition établie et présentée par Philippe Artières (Paris: Editions EHESS, 2011)
Adina Arvatu

Read Full Post »

New issue of materiali foucaultiani (II:4), consecrated mostly (but not exclusively) to “Butler/Foucault: Undoing Norms, Reworking Subjects”.

COPERTINA II,4

Table of contents

A che prezzo si diviene soggetti?  (pp. 3-7)

Laura Cremonesi, Orazio Irrera, Daniele Lorenzini, Martina Tazzioli

FULL ARTICLE

Butler/Foucault: Undoing Norms, Reworking Subjects

Introduzione  (pp. 9-16)

  Laura Cremonesi, Orazio Irrera, Daniele Lorenzini, Martina Tazzioli

FULL ARTICLE

Vulnerabilità e resistenza. Intervista a Judith Butler  (pp. 17-26)

di Federica Sossi e Martina Tazzioli

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Vulnerability and Resistance. Interview with Judith Butler  (pp. 27-36)

by Federica Sossi and Martina Tazzioli

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Barred Subjects. Framing the Criminal Body with Foucault and Butler  (pp. 37-68)

Sophie Fuggle

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Gli atti insurrezionali discorsivi dei prigionieri di Guantánamo: la rivendicazione di una politica della vulnerabilità  (pp. 69-93)

Laura De Grazia

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Alterità della vita e alterazione del mondo. Ritorno sulla figura del cinico in Foucault e la performance drag in Butler  (pp. 95-114)

Céline Van Caillie

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE       [READ IT IN FRENCH]

Confessioni precarie. Veridizione di sé e vulnerabilità alle norme in Michel Foucault e Judith Butler  (pp. 115-140)

  Attilio Bragantini

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Soggetto, potere, discorso. Da Foucault a Butler, passando da Bourdieu  (pp. 141-163)

  Philippe Sabot

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE       [READ IT IN FRENCH]

Corpi Soggetti Norme  (pp. 165-189)

  Carlo Parisi

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

The Departure from Categories and the Temporality of Norms. Working through Political Epistemology with Foucault and Butler  (pp. 191-215)

  Martina Tazzioli

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

Saggi

Michel Foucault: carne, concupiscenza e corpo casto  (pp. 217-235)

 Arianna Sforzini

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE

L’archivio e gli archivi. Archeologia dei discorsi e governo dei viventi  (pp. 237-254)

Alain Brossat

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE       [READ IT IN FRENCH]

Michel Foucault e la Rivoluzione francese  (pp. 255-282)

  Sophie Wahnich

ABSTRACT       FULL ARTICLE       [READ IT IN FRENCH]

Read Full Post »

Gouvernementalité et biopolitique : les historiens et Michel Foucault
Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine, 2013/4-5 (n° 60-4/4 bis). 208 pages.

Further info

Sommaire
Foucault historien ?

Michael C. Behrent
Penser le XXe siècle avec Michel Foucault

Paolo Napoli
Foucault et l’histoire des normativités

Luca Paltrinieri
Biopouvoir, les sources historiennes d’une fiction politique

Des outils pour l’histoire

Sezin Topçu
Technosciences, pouvoirs et résistances : une approche par la gouvernementalité

Luc Berlivet
Les ressorts de la « biopolitique » : « dispositifs de sécurité » et processus de « subjectivation » au prisme de l’histoire de la santé

Jean-Baptiste Fressoz
Biopouvoir et désinhibitions modernes : la fabrication du consentement technologique au tournant des XVIIIe et XIXe siècles

Parcours foucaldiens en histoire

Vincent Denis
L’histoire de la police après Foucault. Un parcours historien

Philippe Artières
Un historien foucaldien ?

Read Full Post »

tweetsDeleuze / Foucault: A Neoliberal Diagram, Mediatropes Vol 4, No 1 (2013)

Link to issue. Full PDFs available

Table of Contents

Editorial Introduction: Neoliberal Diagrammatics and Digital Control
Matthew Tiessen, Greg Elmer

IPO 2.0: The Panopticon Goes Public
Greg Elmer

Resilience versus Resistance: Affectively Modulating Contemporary Diagrams of Social Resilience, Social Sustainability, and Social Innovation
Petra Hroch

Monetary Mediations and the Overcoding of Potential: Nietzsche, Deleuze & Guattari and How the Affective Diagrammatics of Debt Have Gone Global
Matthew Tiessen

Info Nymphos
Erika Biddle

A New Individuation: Deleuze’s Simondon Connection
Andrew Iliadis

Special Semiotic Characters: What is an Obstacle-Sign?
Gary Genosko

Tweets Speak: Indefinite Discipline in the Age of Twitter
Steven James May

Read Full Post »

LEPH_133_L148 Foucault et la phénoménologie, Les Études philosophiques, n° 106, 2013/3, 152 pages. Special Issue

Further info

SOMMAIRE
Page 311 à 315
Jean-Claude Monod Présentation

Page 317 à 332
Philippe Sabot Foucault et Merleau-Ponty : un dialogue impossible ?

Page 333 à 344
Natalie Depraz De Husserl à Foucault : la restitution pratique de la phénoménologie

Page 345 à 358
Jean-Claude Monod La méditation cartésienne de Foucault

Page 359 à 368
Felix Heidenreich Une archéologie de l’« archéologie ». Sur une parenté rhétorique entre Husserl et Foucault

Page 369 à 371
Edmund Husserl Archéologie phénoménologique (1932)

Page 373 à 381
Guillaume Le Blanc Se moquer de la phénoménologie, est-ce encore faire de la phénoménologie ?

Read Full Post »

Critique de la participation et gouvernementalité, Participations N° 6, 2013/2, 228 pages
Special Issue

Further info

SOMMAIRE
Dossier : Critique de la participation et gouvernementalité
Page 5 à 33
Guillaume Gourgues et al. Gouvernementalité et participation Lectures critiques

Page 35 à 63
Pierre Sauvêtre La problématisation de la participation à travers l’histoire de la gouvernementalité

Page 65 à 86
Sandrine Rui « Où donc est le danger ? » Participation et usages de Foucault

Page 87 à 118
Luigi Pellizzoni Une idée sur le déclin ? Évaluer la nouvelle critique de la délibération publique

Page 119 à 139
Doris Buu-Sao « Perúpetro est ton ami » : un gouvernement des contestataires en Amazonie péruvienne

Page 141 à 165
Alicia Márquez Murrieta Quand participation rime avec institutionnalisation Société civile, santé reproductive et critiques féministes au Mexique

Page 167 à 189
John Clarke L’enrôlement des gens ordinaires L’évitement du politique au cœur des nouvelles stratégies gouvernementales ?

Read Full Post »

Les néolibéralismes de Michel Foucault, Raisons politiques, N° 52, 2013/4, 172 pages. Special Issue

Further info

Editorial

Frédéric Gros et al., Introduction

Pierre Dardot, Le capitalisme à la lumière du néolibéralisme

Stéphane Haber, Le néolibéralisme est-il une phase du capitalisme ?

Antoine Garapon, Michel Foucault, visionnaire du droit contemporain

Maurizio Lazzarato, Naissance de la biopolitique, à la lumière de la crise

Geoffroy de Lagasnerie, Néolibéralisme, théorie politique et pensée critique

Ferhat Taylan, L’interventionnisme environnemental,une stratégie néolibérale

Luca Paltrinieri, Quantifier la qualité Le « capital humain » entre économie, démographie et éducation

Pierre-Olivier Monteil, L’« englobant/englobé » selon Ricoeur :une critique implicite de la raison néolibérale

Denis Ramond, L’ironie de la liberté d’expression

Guillaume Sauvé, Le mort saisit le vif Penser la démocratisation comme processus autoritaire en Russie

Marianne Fougère, Lecture critique

Read Full Post »

CFP, Itineration, Special Edition

Call for Projects: Itineration: Cross-Disciplinary Studies in Rhetoric, Media, and Culture Special Edition: Privacy and Dataveillance Due February 1, 2014

You may view the video and full version of the text-based CFP at this link: http://itineration.org/node/45

The special edition, Privacy and Dataveillance

Itineration: Cross-Disciplinary Studies in Rhetoric, Media, and Culture invites projects that engage questions of data collection and dataveillance. Some possible areas of inquiry may include, but are not limited to:

* Foucault’s metaphor of the panopticon and its relationship to questions concerning dataveillance
* The rhetorical means companies use to promote dataveillance tracking
* The concept of anonymity within social networks, social applications, or other data gathering endeavours (such as medical and financial fields)
* Means, implications, and consequences of subverting and resisting data-mining online
* Emergent needs of identity protection online from tracking technologies
* Public rhetorics concerning security and privacy
* The political and social implications of increased observational structures (online or not) and the resulting decrease in privacy
* Issues of legal and educational advocacy for greater privacy protection
* Technical communication regarding how terms of service and end user agreements discuss tracking technologies along with privacy and anonymity
* How data mining and advertising customization leads to assumptions about the attitudes and beliefs in geographical areas
* The roles of embodiment and disembodiment connected with gender and identity/privacy and anonymity
* The relationship between decreased privacy and anonymity online and boutique and big data practices.

Interested parties are invited to submit multimedia projects of varying style, form, and content. We are especially interested in projects that push the boundaries in their composition and presentation. In short, please experiment. Play. Learn a new trick. To that end, please note that Itineration no longer publishes text-based articles (“traditional” essay format). Please send any questions concerning project design, format, technical specifications, etc. to Senior Editor and Technical Specialist, Gerald Jackson, at geraldsjackson@gmail.com

Submissions should be emailed directly to Special Edition editor, Estee Beck, at esteenbeck@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions is February 1st, 2014. Submission accepted for publication will be published on a rolling basis upon completing the editorial process.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,643 other followers

%d bloggers like this: